Stage 13: Murat > Rodez

The big climbs of the Pyrénées are behind us and the Alps are a few days ahead. This 198.5km stage isn’t a flat sprinters’ stage, with three climbs in the last 60km, but hopefully we’ll see Team Sky relax a little and allow some of the non-GC contenders have a day in the spotlight. Perhaps this is time for Tommy V to justify that TV time and take a stage, although he’ll have serious competition from Peter Sagan.

As we leave the Pyrénées, we head towards Aubrac territory.

8549134537_2220b4ab5c_zImage: Jérôme Therond

Whilst not as scarce as the cattle we’ve tried to spot over the past few stages, they are certainly not as populous as the Charolais we’ve been seeing all over the place. They range in colour from fawn to brown – sometimes blonder and sometimes a tad darker than the one pictured – with white socks and a white-ringed nose. Originally bred by monks, they were used as a triple-purpose animal: draft, dairy and beef. According to my cattle bible, cross-breeding resulted in a faster maturing animal and the breed society was formed in 1914. A highly successful conservation program was launched in 1976; by 1979 there were around 80,000 Aubracs in France. Unfortunately a high rate of brucellosis infection was discovered in the herd. Today, the local population is estimated to be around 10,000.

What to eat for this stage? Well, the milk from Aubrac cattle was used in the Laguiole cheese, a key ingredient in the potato dishes of the region, aligot and truffade. You don’t need to spend too much effort tracking down Laguiole – it’s a tomme cheese so grab whatever cows milk tomme is available near you. The only real decision is which recipe to make?

 

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  1. Pingback: Stage 14: Rodez > Mende | Les Vaches du Tour

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